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Vladimir Putin offers condolences to Britain after Queen’s death

As tributes pour in from around the world after the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Russian dictator Vladimir Putin has also expressed his condolences.

In the midst of prosecution for his bloody and brutal war against Ukraine, which has sent Russia-Britain relations to even lower lows, Putin reached out to King Charles III in a telegram.

“The most important events in the recent history of the United Kingdom are inextricably linked to Her Majesty’s name,” wrote the Russian tyrant.

For many decades, Elizabeth II rightly enjoyed the love and respect of her subjects, as well as authority on the world stage.

“I wish you courage and perseverance in this heavy, irreparable loss. I ask you to convey the words of sincere condolences and support to the members of the Royal Family and to all the people of Great Britain.’

The condolences come after the Queen herself appeared to have subtly measured up to Putin when they met in 2003 during a state visit to the UK – the first by a Russian leader since the reign of Queen Victoria, when Alexander II died in 1874. came to visit.

 

Russian dictator Vladimir Putin has expressed his condolences on the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Pictured: A carriage carrying Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Russian President Vladimir Putin is escorted by royal guards to Buckingham Palace in central London, UK, June 24, 2003

Russian dictator Vladimir Putin has expressed his condolences on the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Pictured: A carriage carrying Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and Russian President Vladimir Putin is escorted by royal guards to Buckingham Palace in central London, UK, June 24, 2003

 

Pictured: Britain's Queen Elizabeth II stands next to Russian President Putin, left, before a state banquet at Buckingham Palace in London Tuesday, June 24, 2003

Pictured: Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II stands next to Russian President Putin, left, before a state banquet at Buckingham Palace in London Tuesday, June 24, 2003

Under Tony Blair’s Labor government, then-Home Secretary David Blunkett’s guide dog reacted defensively to the Russian president’s presence.

Blunkett told the BBC: ‘The only time I met Vladimir Putin was in 2003 on an official visit and my dog ​​at the time barked really loudly.

“I apologized to the Queen who was clearly hosting. I don’t think I’m giving anything away when I said, “Sorry Your Majesty the dog is barking.”

She said, “Dogs have interesting instincts, don’t they?”

Putin – notorious for his lax punctuality – had made the queen wait 14 minutes before their meeting.

The Queen and Putin were due to meet again in June 2014 at a D-Day memorial event in France.

The event happened months after Charles claimed he had presciently compared Putin’s regime to that of Nazi Germany, which appeared to have soured relations considerably.

After a group photo with world leaders, the Queen was helped down a flight of stairs by then-US President Barack Obama and New Zealand Governor General Jerry Mateparae.

 

After a group photo with world leaders, the Queen was helped down a flight of stairs by then-US President Barack Obama (the Queen's left) and New Zealand Governor General Jerry Mateparae (the Queen's right). But Putin (right), standing next to her and able to help, just looked away

After a group photo with world leaders, the Queen was helped down a flight of stairs by then-US President Barack Obama (the Queen’s left) and New Zealand Governor General Jerry Mateparae (the Queen’s right). But Putin (right), standing next to her and able to help, just looked away

 

The Queen has seen 14 American presidents come and go during her reign. She has personally met all of them with the exception of Lyndon B. Johnson. Pictured: The Queen and Joe Biden at Windsor Castle on June 13, 2021

The Queen has seen 14 American presidents come and go during her reign. She has personally met all of them with the exception of Lyndon B. Johnson. Pictured: The Queen and Joe Biden at Windsor Castle on June 13, 2021

 

When US President George Bush arrived with Queen Elizabeth II for the state banquet at Buckingham Palace during his state visit to the UK on November 19, 2003

When US President George Bush arrived with Queen Elizabeth II for the state banquet at Buckingham Palace during his state visit to the UK on November 19, 2003

 

The Queen with former President Donald Trump during a state banquet in the ballroom of Buckingham Palace in central London on June 3, 2019

The Queen with former President Donald Trump during a state banquet in the ballroom of Buckingham Palace in central London on June 3, 2019

But Putin, standing next to her and able to help, looked away.

But regardless of their leader’s antipathy towards Her Majesty, ordinary Russians have laid flowers in memory of the Queen outside the British Embassy in Moscow.

In the pre-Putin era, in 1994, at the invitation of Boris Yeltsin, the Queen paid a visit to the Russian capital after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

The visit was without controversy, as both countries were eager to improve bilateral relations and the points of contention had yet to settle.

When the Queen and Prince Phillip landed, they were then taken to the Kremlin where they were greeted by Yeltsin and his wife, Naina.

The royal couple were also treated to a special performance by the Bolshoi Ballet.

The Queen came to the throne during the last days of Josef Stalin’s reign and saw 11 Russian and Soviet leaders come and go during her reign.

Likewise, she has seen 14 US presidents come and go during her reign. She has personally met all of them with the exception of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Earlier today, Putin’s nemesis, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, had expressed his condolences.

“It is with deep sadness that we learn of the passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II,” he wrote on Twitter.

 

A woman lays flowers in memory of Queen Elizabeth II at the United Kingdom embassy in Moscow

A woman lays flowers in memory of Queen Elizabeth II at the United Kingdom embassy in Moscow

 

But regardless of their leader's antipathy towards Her Majesty, ordinary Russians have laid flowers in memory of the Queen outside the British Embassy in Moscow.

But regardless of their leader’s antipathy towards Her Majesty, ordinary Russians have laid flowers in memory of the Queen outside the British Embassy in Moscow.

“On behalf of the UA people, we extend our sincere condolences to the @RoyalFamily, the entire United Kingdom and the Commonwealth on this irreparable loss. Our thoughts and prayers are with you.’

It is a rare moment when the two warring leaders are united. On the battlefield, however, after six months of Russian offensives, the initiative seems to have finally spilled over to the Ukrainian side.

Ten days ago, a counter-offensive was launched in the Kherson region that startled the Russians but appeared to be progressing slowly.

But now, through the fog of war, it seems that this could be a smart move by Ukrainian generals to distract Russian troops and fool them into pooling their forces in a position that is hard to imagine. supply is.

Some of Putin’s best men are now virtually trapped in the city, bullied by Ukrainian artillery and no easy way to retreat across the Dnipro River after HIMARS attacks destroyed key bridges.

 

The Queen and President Boris Yeltsin raise their glasses of champagne to toast each other at the 1994 state banquet at Moscow's Granovitaya Palace

The Queen and President Boris Yeltsin raise their glasses of champagne to toast each other at the 1994 state banquet at Moscow’s Granovitaya Palace

 

The Queen with President Boris Yeltsin in Moscow's Red Square during her 1994 visit after the fall of the Soviet Union

The Queen with President Boris Yeltsin in Moscow’s Red Square during her 1994 visit after the fall of the Soviet Union

 

Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev is greeted by Queen Elizabeth II at the entrance to Windsor Castle on April 7, 1989

Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev is greeted by Queen Elizabeth II at the entrance to Windsor Castle on April 7, 1989

This clever tactic caused Ukrainian commanders to move Russian forces to the south of the country before being pinned down with a counter-attack around the city of Kherson.

Meanwhile, there are reports of a dramatic Ukrainian offensive in the east near Kharkiv that has smashed through thin Russian lines and is leading to a breakout in what had become a static and attrition battle.

Those troops are now advancing rapidly, threatening important supply lines to Donbas. Like dr. Mike Martin, an ex-British army officer now at King’s College, said it on Twitter yesterday: ‘If [Ukraine] if you can manage that, it’s serious rotation time.’

Putin faces another embarrassing defeat in the face. If his forces are forced to withdraw from Kherson and stop their attack on Donbas, even he will have a hard time playing off the invasion as a success.

Meanwhile, Ukraine applauds its successes. According to a commander speaking out today, troops have now recaptured a total of 270 square miles of territory across both fronts — a long way from victory, but no mean feat.

Source: Dailymail

 

 

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