Breaking News

The Queen’s coffin arrives in Edinburgh

Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin is arriving in Edinburgh to lie in rest at the Palace of Holyroodhouse overnight, as tens of thousands of mourners stood for hours in the streets of the Scottish capital to pay their respects to the late monarch as she left her beloved Balmoral Castle for the last time. 

The royal procession led by the hearse carrying the Queen’s oak coffin – draped in the Royal Standard for Scotland with a wreath of Balmoral flowers on top – crossed the River Forth via the Queensferry Crossing at around 4pm, nearly six hours after starting its 180-mile journey to Edinburgh. 

As the convoy travelled down the Royal Mile, the crowd fell silent in respect. Moments later, a round of applause and cheers broke out. 

The hearse bearing the Queen’s coffin then travelled down the Royal Mile, arriving at the Palace, just before 4.30pm where it was received by Prince Andrew, Prince Edward and his wife Sophie, Countess of Wessex. The Queen’s cortege received a guard of honour by the King’s Bodyguard for Scotland as it entered the palace, where it will stay overnight before being moved to St Giles’ Cathedral tomorrow – where earlier a large crowd gathered to witness the proclamation of King Charles III.

A single motorbike police outrider led the way as the hearse – followed by six vehicles, including the late Queen’s daughter the Princess Royal and her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence – travelled at a stately pace through the Aberdeenshire countryside. At one point, as the cortege travelled through Dundee, a lone long-stemmed flower could be seen on the hearse windscreen and in a rural part of the route farmers paid homage to the monarch with tractors lined up in a field.

Hundreds lined the main street of Ballater, the picturesque Victorian village closest to the Balmoral estate, where locals considered her a neighbour, as the Queen’s coffin was driven slowly through. Her Majesty and her family were often seen in the village in Royal Deeside, which she had visited since childhood and where the Royal Family have space to be themselves.

The hearse passed Glenmuick Church, where the Rev David Barr rang the church bells 70 times after the Queen’s death was announced. 

Flowers were thrown into the hearse’s path by well-wishers on both sides of the road in Ballater, which was sombre and silent. The hearse slowed to a fast walking pace and mourners could clearly see the royal standard-draped coffin and the wreath featuring flowers from the Balmoral estate, including sweet peas – one of the Queen’s favourite flowers – dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir. 

Earlier, the Queen’s oak coffin was carried to the hearse by six Balmoral estate gamekeepers tasked with the symbolic gesture. It had been at rest in the Balmoral ballroom so the monarch’s estate workers could say their goodbyes. 

In other developments today: 

  • An emotional King Charles was greeted by well-wishers as he arrived at Buckingham Palace where he will meet with representatives from the Commonwealth;
  • Prince William vowed to serve Wales with ‘humility’ – after he paid tribute to his ‘extraordinary Grannie’ in a heartbreaking statement yesterday; 
  • The Prince and Princess of Wales yesterday reunited with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, for a historic walkabout at Windsor; 
  • Church services took place around the UK today to remember Her Majesty on first Sunday after her death; 
  • The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby told his congregation that this was an ‘unexpectedly extraordinary Sunday’ as he paid tribute to the later monarch; 
  • The Sussexes’ children Archie and Lilibet continued to be listed as ‘Master’ and ‘Miss’ on the new order of succession; 
  • First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, paid tribute to the late Queen in a tweet; 
  • Former Prime Minister David Cameron described how he had to apologise to Her Majesty after revealing details of private phone call. He also revealed that he help Charles prepare for becoming King by holding ‘practice’ audiences.
 

The Queen's coffin is lifted out of the hearse and carried inside the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh

The Queen’s coffin is lifted out of the hearse and carried inside the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh

 

The hearse carrying the late Queen's coffin arriving at the Palace of Holyroodhouse this afternoon

The hearse carrying the late Queen’s coffin arriving at the Palace of Holyroodhouse this afternoon

 

Queen Elizabeth II 's coffin is arriving in Edinburgh to lie in state at the Palace of Holyroodhouse overnight

Queen Elizabeth II ‘s coffin is arriving in Edinburgh to lie in state at the Palace of Holyroodhouse overnight

 

The hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, passing over the Queensferry Crossing as it continues its journey to Edinburgh from Balmoral

The hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, passing over the Queensferry Crossing as it continues its journey to Edinburgh from Balmoral

 

The hearse carrying the oak coffin of Queen Elizabeth II arriving at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh

The hearse carrying the oak coffin of Queen Elizabeth II arriving at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh

 

People in Edinburgh await the arrival of the hearse carrying the body of the late Queen Elizabeth II from Balmoral

People in Edinburgh await the arrival of the hearse carrying the body of the late Queen Elizabeth II from Balmoral

 

Guards walk along the Royal Mile as people start to gather to watch the Royal cortege in Edinburgh

Guards walk along the Royal Mile as people start to gather to watch the Royal cortege in Edinburgh

 

The Duke of York (right) awaits the arrival of hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, as it completes its journey from Balmoral to the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh

The Duke of York (right) awaits the arrival of hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, as it completes its journey from Balmoral to the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh

With the monarch’s death prominent in the public consciousness, the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby sympathised with those reminded of the death of a loved one in his Sunday sermon at Canterbury Cathedral.

He said: ‘Many people will be navigating their way around the raw and ragged edges of grief today. All because of the Queen. But many families as well will have lost loved ones or been reminded of the loss of loved ones this week. Their grief may well feel all the more painful during this time of national and international mourning for loss is overwhelming to the person bereaved.’

The First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, paid tribute to the Queen, calling her ‘extraordinary’.

In a tweet, she said: ‘A sad and poignant moment as Her Majesty, The Queen leaves her beloved Balmoral for the final time. Today, as she makes her journey to Edinburgh, Scotland will pay tribute to an extraordinary woman.’

Tomorrow, Edinburgh will become the focus of national mourning, with the Queen’s coffin carried in a procession from the palace to St Giles Cathedral, where a Vigil of the Princes is expected to take place before it lies in state for 24 hours.  

The Queen’s poignant final journey will eventually end at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, where she will be buried alongside her beloved husband Prince Philip alongside her father, George VI, the Queen Mother, and her sister, Princess Margaret. 

 

The hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, passes through Ballater

The hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped with the Royal Standard of Scotland, passes through Ballater

 

Most people stood in silence as the convoy passed through the village of Ballater, while others filmed the moment on their phones

Most people stood in silence as the convoy passed through the village of Ballater, while others filmed the moment on their phones 

 

A sombre Princess Royal in a Bentley limousine behind the Queen's hearse as it travels through Aberdeenshire to Edinburgh

A sombre Princess Royal in a Bentley limousine behind the Queen’s hearse as it travels through Aberdeenshire to Edinburgh 

 

Princess Anne (pictured), her husband Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, the minister of Crathie Kirk and a representative of the Lord chamberlain’s Office are in the convoy following the Queen’s coffin

 

The wreath is made up of flowers from the Balmoral estate including sweet peas - one of the Queen's favourite flowers - dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir

The wreath is made up of flowers from the Balmoral estate including sweet peas – one of the Queen’s favourite flowers – dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir

 

The Queen ‘s oak coffin was today seen leaving Balmoral Castle on its way to Edinburgh in a black Mercedes Benz 

 

The coffin is draped in the Royal Standard for Scotland, which has been used by generations of Scottish monarchs 

 

Members of the public line the streets in Ballater, Scotland, as the hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II passes through

Members of the public line the streets in Ballater, Scotland, as the hearse carrying the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II passes through

 

People stand to pay their respects as the hearse carrying the body of Queen Elizabeth II makes its way towards Edinburgh, on the A90 in Stracathro, Angus

People stand to pay their respects as the hearse carrying the body of Queen Elizabeth II makes its way towards Edinburgh, on the A90 in Stracathro, Angus 

 

Large crowds lined the A90 through Angus to watch the convoy of cars pass by on its way to Edinburgh

Large crowds lined the A90 through Angus to watch the convoy of cars pass by on its way to Edinburgh 

 

Well-wishers line the road in preparation for the arrival of the cortege in Cults, a suburb on the western edge of Aberdeen

Well-wishers line the road in preparation for the arrival of the cortege in Cults, a suburb on the western edge of Aberdeen

 

People gather as the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II passes through Banchory this afternoon

People gather as the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II passes through Banchory this afternoon

 

This afternoon, the King arrived at Buckingham Palace, where he will meet with Commonwealth general secretary Patricia Scotland

This afternoon, the King arrived at Buckingham Palace, where he will meet with Commonwealth general secretary Patricia Scotland

 

Charles could be seen waving to people through the car windows, as children sat on top of parents' shoulders and people took photos as they watched the new sovereign arrive

 Charles could be seen waving to people through the car windows, as children sat on top of parents’ shoulders and people took photos as they watched the new sovereign arrive

 

Crowds lining the roads cheered and waved as his black car drove down The Mall and into the Palace gates accompanied by a motorcade of four cars and four police motorbikes

Crowds lining the roads cheered and waved as his black car drove down The Mall and into the Palace gates accompanied by a motorcade of four cars and four police motorbikes

 

Members if the public help arrange and prepare flowers for display in Green Park due to the large volumes being laid for the Queen following her death

Members if the public help arrange and prepare flowers for display in Green Park due to the large volumes being laid for the Queen following her death

 

Flower tributes are continuing to be brought into Green Park as masses of the public head to central London to visit the royal park

Flower tributes are continuing to be brought into Green Park as masses of the public head to central London to visit the royal park

 

Huge areas have been covered in flowers in Green Park as people are encouraged to bring their tributes to the royal park beside Buckingham Palace instead of placing them near the gate

Huge areas have been covered in flowers in Green Park as people are encouraged to bring their tributes to the royal park beside Buckingham Palace instead of placing them near the gate

 

A huge queue of people wait in line to lay flowers for Queen Elizabeth II in front of Buckingham Palace this afternoon

A huge queue of people wait in line to lay flowers for Queen Elizabeth II in front of Buckingham Palace this afternoon 

Hundreds lined the main street as the Queen’s coffin was driven slowly through Ballater, the village closest to the Balmoral estate, where many locals considered her a neighbour.

Policing operation for funeral will be ‘hugely complex’  

A senior Metropolitan Police officer has said policing in the run-up to the Queen’s funeral will be a ‘hugely complex operation’.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Stuart Cundy on Sunday said hundreds of extra officers had already been called in as thousands descended on the capital following the monarch’s death.

Officers are likely to be concerned with managing crowds, with a huge number of mourners expected to queue for several hours, including overnight, to pay their respects to the Queen as she lies in state, expected to be from Wednesday.

Leaders from around the globe will also travel to the UK for the state funeral on Monday, meaning security will be of increased concern.

Mr Cundy said: ‘Our role is to ensure this is going to be a safe and a secure set of events.

‘Our policing operation is hugely complex, with a huge amount of detail within it, as you can well imagine.

‘So we’re always mindful of all manner of different potential things that might occur. We know that not just the eyes of the United Kingdom but the world will be on London at this point in time.’

Members of the public are being encouraged to engage with police and speak to them if they have any concerns.

Mr Cundy said: ‘This is a point in time for everybody to remember Her late Majesty the Queen, to pay respects, and I think also to celebrate the long life of public service which she demonstrated.

‘As a police officer, we swear a solemn oath and it’s a real privilege to be serving His Majesty the King. The Met is well prepared and people will already have seen significant policing presence of my colleagues here in London, and that will continue to build over the coming days.

‘We’re working closely with other police forces here in London, and many other partners and other agencies that are involved in the many events that will take place from now leading up to the state funeral on Monday.’

World leaders are expected to be in London for the state funeral, but Mr Cundy said the force was prepared for their visit.

The Queen and her family were often seen in the village on her beloved Royal Deeside, which she had visited since childhood and where the royal family are allowed space to be themselves.

Many shops in the picturesque Victorian village are displaying photographs of the Queen in their windows in tribute. 

The hearse passed Glenmuick Church where the Rev Davi Barr had rung the church bells 70 times after her death was announced. 

There was impeccable silence as the funeral procession passed through the village.

Well-wishers who had waited patiently for the opportunity to pay their respects bowed their heads while others saluted as the hearse drove slowly by.

Afterwards, Margaret MacKenzie, from Inverness, said: ‘It was very dignified. It was nice to see that a lot of people came out to support and pay their respects.’

Elizabeth Taylor, from Aberdeen, had tears in her eyes as she considered what she had just seen.

She said: ‘It was very emotional. It was respectful and showed what they think of the Queen.

‘She certainly gave service to this country, even up until a few days before her death.’ 

Guest house manager Victoria Pacheco said: ‘She meant such a lot to people in this area. People were crying, it was amazing to see.’

She said guests were overcome when news broke of the Queen’s death last week.

Elizabeth Taylor, from Aberdeen, had tears in her eyes as she considered what she had just seen.

She said: ‘It was very emotional. It was respectful and showed what they think of the Queen.

‘She certainly gave service to this country even up until a few days before her death.’

Families with young began gathering in the town from 7am. 

Care assistant Elaine Reid stood wrapped in a tartan blanket with her sons Innis, 11, and Darragh, 16, in the street by Glenmuick Church. 

She explained that she was happy to get up early and drive the one-hour- journey from their home in Buckie so her children could remember the Queen.

Elaine, 40, told MailOnline: ‘We came here today to pay our respects because the Queen has spent her whole life in service to our country. So this is the least we could do.

‘And I wanted the kids to be here so that they can remember this day and be able to tell their children that they were here to say goodbye to the Queen.’

Parents Lorna and Andre Andrasovska stood patiently in thick coats and bobble hats at the roadside with their daughter Zofia, 10, and son Jacob, four. 

The couple explained how the Queen had become a constant presence in their lives after they moved to the UK from Slovakia.   

People in Banchory line the street as the Queen's coffin is driven from Balmoral to Edinburgh where it will lie in rest for 24 hours

People in Banchory line the street as the Queen’s coffin is driven from Balmoral to Edinburgh where it will lie in rest for 24 hours

 

People gather in tribute on the side of the road as the cortege carrying the coffin of the Queen passes by in Banchory

People gather in tribute on the side of the road as the cortege carrying the coffin of the Queen passes by in Banchory

 

People in Banchory gather to pay their respects as the Queen's coffin makes its way to Edinburgh today

People in Banchory gather to pay their respects as the Queen’s coffin makes its way to Edinburgh today 

 

A Union flag is held aloft as Queen Elizabeth II's coffin passes through Aberdeen as it continues its journey to Edinburgh

A Union flag is held aloft as Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin passes through Aberdeen as it continues its journey to Edinburgh 

 

Onlookers watch on as the Princess Royal passes by in a vintage Bentley over the King George VI bridge on its way from Balmoral to Edinburgh

Onlookers watch on as the Princess Royal passes by in a vintage Bentley over the King George VI bridge on its way from Balmoral to Edinburgh

 

The Royal Marines march down the Royal Mile during an Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Mercat Cross, Edinburgh

The Royal Marines march down the Royal Mile during an Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Mercat Cross, Edinburgh

 

Military guards march in Edinburgh prior to the arrival of the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II

Military guards march in Edinburgh prior to the arrival of the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II

 

Members of the armed services march near St Giles' Cathedral, in Edinburgh, as the Queen's coffin travels to the city

Members of the armed services march near St Giles’ Cathedral, in Edinburgh, as the Queen’s coffin travels to the city 

 

Military guards in traditional dress march prior to the arrival of the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II

Military guards in traditional dress march prior to the arrival of the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II

 

Drummers at the front of a military band play prior to the Proclamations near St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh

Drummers at the front of a military band play prior to the Proclamations near St Giles’ Cathedral, Edinburgh

 

An Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Mercat Cross, Edinburgh, publicly proclaims King Charles III as the new monarch

 

Edinburgh's Accession Proclamation Ceremony was watched by the public with a military band performing

Edinburgh’s Accession Proclamation Ceremony was watched by the public with a military band performing 

 

The Lord Lyon King of Arms reads a public Proclamation to the people of Scotland outside St Giles Cathedral

The Lord Lyon King of Arms reads a public Proclamation to the people of Scotland outside St Giles Cathedral

 

Canons were fired in Edinburgh following the Accession Proclamation Ceremony which proclaimed King Charles III as the new monarch

Canons were fired in Edinburgh following the Accession Proclamation Ceremony which proclaimed King Charles III as the new monarch

 

Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister of Scotland and Leader of the Scottish National Party at Meerkat Cross, Edinburgh ahead of the arrival of the Queen's coffin

Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister of Scotland and Leader of the Scottish National Party at Meerkat Cross, Edinburgh ahead of the arrival of the Queen’s coffin

Lorna, 40, from Elgin, told MailOnline: ‘We used to live in Windsor and we would often see the Queen and Prince Phillip come through the town.

‘And over the years when world leaders came and went she was always there. It was great to see a woman at the head of the table of world leaders.’

Andre, 48, a doctor, added: ‘What we are seeing today is the departure of the soul of the nation. It is a very significant event.’

The couple stood patiently in thick coats and bobble hats at the roadside with their daughter Zofia, 10, and son Jacob, four.

James and Margaret Phinn drove up to Ballater from Glasgow. James, 58, said: ‘We came up to pay our respects. The Queen has been there for me for my whole life so I just want to show her the respect she deserves.’ 

Reverend David Barr said locals regarded the Windsors as ‘like neighbours’, particularly as the Queen had been coming to Balmoral Castle since she was a girl, and people in the area had long-standing relationships with the estate.

He said: ‘When she comes up here, and she goes through those gates, I believe the royal part of her stays mostly outside.

‘She was able to be a wife, a loving wife, a loving mum, a loving gran and then later on a loving great gran – and aunty – and be normal.’   

 

A trumpeteer sounds a fanfare during an Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle, Wales

A trumpeteer sounds a fanfare during an Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle, Wales

 

In Cardiff, the 3rd battalion of the Royal Welsh and The Band of the Royal Welsh arrive at Cardiff Castle accompanied by the regimental mascot during of the Welsh Proclamation of King Charles III

In Cardiff, the 3rd battalion of the Royal Welsh and The Band of the Royal Welsh arrive at Cardiff Castle accompanied by the regimental mascot during of the Welsh Proclamation of King Charles III

 

Lance Corporal Shenkin IV, the regimental mascot goat, accompanies the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Welsh regiment

Lance Corporal Shenkin IV, the regimental mascot goat, accompanies the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Welsh regiment

 

Lance Corporal Shenkin IV, the regimental mascot goat, accompanies the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Welsh regiment to the Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle

Lance Corporal Shenkin IV, the regimental mascot goat, accompanies the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Welsh regiment to the Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle

 

Battalion of the Royal Welsh, supported by the Band of the Royal Welsh, march ahead of the proclamation ceremony in Cardiff

Battalion of the Royal Welsh, supported by the Band of the Royal Welsh, march ahead of the proclamation ceremony in Cardiff

 

A gun salute is fired during the proclamation ceremony for King Charles III at Cardiff Castle, Wales

A gun salute is fired during the proclamation ceremony for King Charles III at Cardiff Castle, Wales

 

Wales Herald of Arms Extraordinary, Thomas Lloyd, reads the proclamation in English at the Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle. To the left stands Wales' First Minister Mark Drakeford

Wales Herald of Arms Extraordinary, Thomas Lloyd, reads the proclamation in English at the Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Cardiff Castle. To the left stands Wales’ First Minister Mark Drakeford 

 

EDINBURGH: An Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Mercat Cross publicly proclaiming King Charles as the new monarch

EDINBURGH: An Accession Proclamation Ceremony at Mercat Cross publicly proclaiming King Charles as the new monarch

 

The Proclamation of King Charles III was read out in local areas across the UK, including the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

The Proclamation of King Charles III was read out in local areas across the UK, including the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead

 

Tower Governor Andrew Jackson addresses the public on Tower Green during an Accession Proclamation Ceremony at the Tower of London today

Tower Governor Andrew Jackson addresses the public on Tower Green during an Accession Proclamation Ceremony at the Tower of London today 

In Edinburgh, royal fans began lining the streets more than eight hours before the Queen’s coffin was due to arrive in the city.

Many travelled through the night to secure a spot close to the historic Palace of Holyroodhouse – the monarch’s official Scottish residence.

A massive security operation began in the Scottish capital as officials prepared for an unprecedented influx of visitors.

Early today officers drafted in from across Scotland began taking up position along the city’s famous Royal Mile which runs between the palace and Edinburgh Castle.

Residents have been warned to expect ‘significant disruption’ as a series of major roads were closed in the city to allow access for the courage and as part of security members.

Today mourners set off in the early hours to make sure they did not miss out after an influx from visitors from around the world meant all hotels, B&B’s and guesthouses in the city were fully booked on Saturday night. 

 

The coffin, which is draped in the Royal Standard of Scotland, is being carried by William Purves, a funeral directors with offices in Edinburgh

The coffin, which is draped in the Royal Standard of Scotland, is being carried by William Purves, a funeral directors with offices in Edinburgh 

 

A slight mist hung in the air at Balmoral Castle early this morning ahead of the Queen’s final departure from what was one of her most beloved places to spend time

 

The wreath is made up of flowers from the Balmoral estate including sweet peas - one of the Queen's favourite flowers - dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir

The wreath is made up of flowers from the Balmoral estate including sweet peas – one of the Queen’s favourite flowers – dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir 

 

There was impeccable silence as the funeral procession drove through the village, as military veterans and dignitaries saluted

There was impeccable silence as the funeral procession drove through the village, as military veterans and dignitaries saluted

 

Well-wishers who had waited patiently for the opportunity to pay their respects bowed their heads while others saluted as the hearse drove slowly by

Well-wishers who had waited patiently for the opportunity to pay their respects bowed their heads while others saluted as the hearse drove slowly by

 

Members of the military mingle with the public as they salute the Queen's hearse as it makes its way through Ballater

Members of the military mingle with the public as they salute the Queen’s hearse as it makes its way through Ballater 

 

Veterans dipped their flags in honour of the Queen as her hearse travelled by, while others bowed their heads

Veterans dipped their flags in honour of the Queen as her hearse travelled by, while others bowed their heads 

 

The Queens cortege passing dignitaries at Duthie park in Aberdeen and crossing the George VI bridge over the river Dee for the final time

The Queens cortege passing dignitaries at Duthie park in Aberdeen and crossing the George VI bridge over the river Dee for the final time

 

Dignitaries salute Queen Elizabeth II's hearse as it passes through the village of Ballater

Dignitaries salute Queen Elizabeth II’s hearse as it passes through the village of Ballater

 

Local people - dressed in black - gather in Ballater in tribute to the Queen as her coffin passed through the village

Local people – dressed in black – gather in Ballater in tribute to the Queen as her coffin passed through the village 

Martha Cowan was the first to arrive at the palace shortly before 8am. Mrs Cowan, 77, was with her two daughters who set off from Glasgow at 6.30am.

She said: ‘We felt we had to come. We wanted to show our appreciation for what she has done over the years.

‘The Queen gave her whole life for the people and the country and she did it right until the day she died. She was an amazing woman.

‘Charles must be heartbroken. It must be difficult for him. He’s grieving for his mother but he has to get on with the job and it is going to be very hard to replace her.’

Joanne Thornton, a secondary school deputy head teacher, stayed the night in a camper van with husband Dan, 39, and their 12-year-old son Bede.

They set off from their home in Newcastle and made the 100 mile trip. Joanne, 46, said: ‘We decided to come up yesterday afternoon.

‘All the hotels were booked and were incredibly expensive so we came in the camper van and stayed on a campsite 20 minutes away. ‘I’ve loved the Royal Family since I was about four years old.

‘I’ve always said since I was a child that the day the Queen died I would come to pay my respects and that is what we are doing. ‘We still might go down to London for the funeral.’

Husband Dan, who is also a teacher, said: ‘I heard a commentator saying that people will feel disoriented and I think that perfectly sums up who people do feel.

‘To me the Queen was part of our national identity and you’ve almost lost a part of that now.’  

 

The coffin is expected to stop in Ballater for a short ceremony in the town famed for its connections to the Royals.

The coffin is expected to stop in Ballater for a short ceremony in the town famed for its connections to the Royals. 

 

Members of the public line the streets of Ballater, a village near Balmoral, where many locals know the Queen personally

Members of the public line the streets of Ballater, a village near Balmoral, where many locals know the Queen personally 

 

The Queen's coffin, draped in the Royal Standard for Scotland, will be taken by road via Aberdeen, Dundee and Perth

The Queen’s coffin, draped in the Royal Standard for Scotland, will be taken by road via Aberdeen, Dundee and Perth

 

People gather along the streets in Ballater, the closest town to Balmoral as they wait to view the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II

People gather along the streets in Ballater, the closest town to Balmoral as they wait to view the cortege carrying the coffin of the late Queen Elizabeth II

 

Young children, who holding Union flags and the other a corgi, wait in Ballater for the arrival of the Queen's coffin

Young children, who holding Union flags and the other a corgi, wait in Ballater for the arrival of the Queen’s coffin 

 

Families have been seen setting up picnic chairs and attaching union flags to barriers outside Ballater's Glenmuick Church from about 7am

Families have been seen setting up picnic chairs and attaching union flags to barriers outside Ballater’s Glenmuick Church from about 7am 

Police said the area leading up to the entrance to Balmoral will be closed to members of the public for the coffin’s departure.

It will leave at 10am and is expected in the city at 4pm. 

‘Now 70 years, she’s given her life, even up to the very last day, she’s given us service.

‘So, here in the village, we want to give back, (and) by allowing the royal family to come here and go into the shops and have a cup of coffee and not be bothered.

‘That’s what this community has done for 70 years.’

He added: ‘As you stand here today and you watch Her Majesty pass, that will be very tangible and be very real for people, and I think that will bring on an overwhelming amount of emotion.’

Tomorrow, a procession will march up the Royal Mile to St Giles’ Cathedral where The Queen will lie at rest and members of the public can pay their respects.

A series of road closures in the capital have already been announced.

Traffic Scotland bosses warned it was an event of unprecedented scale – and said even COP26 could not match the amount of planning that has gone into the operation.

People have been urged to plan ahead and check city centre road closures, weather conditions, and be prepared to spend long periods in their vehicles. 

 

There will be 'overwhelming emotion' when the Queen's coffin passes through the Aberdeenshire village of Ballater, pictured

There will be ‘overwhelming emotion’ when the Queen’s coffin passes through the Aberdeenshire village of Ballater, pictured

 

Families have been seen setting up picnic chairs and attaching union flags to barriers outside the village's Glenmuick Church

Families have been seen setting up picnic chairs and attaching union flags to barriers outside the village’s Glenmuick Church

 

Reverend David Barr said locals regarded the Windsors as 'like neighbours', particularly as the Queen had been coming to Balmoral Castle since she was a girl, and people in the area had long-standing relationships with the estate

Reverend David Barr said locals regarded the Windsors as ‘like neighbours’, particularly as the Queen had been coming to Balmoral Castle since she was a girl, and people in the area had long-standing relationships with the estate

 

Local people dressed in tartan preparing for the arrival of the Queen's coffin at Glenmuick Church in Ballater

Local people dressed in tartan preparing for the arrival of the Queen’s coffin at Glenmuick Church in Ballater 

 

People line the street waiting for the funeral cortage carrying Britain's Queen Elizabeth in the village of Ballater

People line the street waiting for the funeral cortage carrying Britain’s Queen Elizabeth in the village of Ballater

Police chiefs have urged the public to only park in designated areas and to not throw flowers on the road or towards the cortege.

Significant numbers of stewards are being drafted in to work with police officers.

Police Scotland Deputy Chief Constable Malcolm Graham said: ‘Our priority is public safety and we are working with partners, including the UK and Scottish governments, as well as local authorities, to support the delivery of planned events.

‘This includes supporting people and businesses to plan ahead for any potential disruption as a result of road closures, which are largely in the Royal Deeside and Edinburgh areas, and the management of crowds gathering to pay their respects.

‘We understand that the public will want to show their respects to Her Majesty and we would urge them to do so safely.

‘If you are attending to view the Queen’s cortege, please do not leave your vehicle at the side of the road as this poses a risk to public safety. Please only park in designated areas and follow the directions of stewards and police officers.

‘We would also urge people not to stand in unsafe areas and to keep off the carriageway at all times.

‘There will be rolling road closures along the route.

‘Other roads close to the route are expected to be significantly affected as large numbers of people from across Scotland and beyond come to pay their respects.’

 

People wait for the funeral cortage carrying Britain's Queen Elizabeth in the village of Ballater

People wait for the funeral cortage carrying Britain’s Queen Elizabeth in the village of Ballater 

 

A post box with adorned with a black knitted hat and likeness of The Queen in Ballater

A post box with adorned with a black knitted hat and likeness of The Queen in Ballater 

 

A drawing of the Queen against the background of a Union flag which was left amongst flowers outside Balmoral Castle

A drawing of the Queen against the background of a Union flag which was left amongst flowers outside Balmoral Castle

 

Another tribute left among flowers at Balmoral Castle read 'I miss you Queen' on a child's drawing of the late monarch

Another tribute left among flowers at Balmoral Castle read ‘I miss you Queen’ on a child’s drawing of the late monarch

Traffic Scotland operator manager Stein Connelly said: ‘This is an event of unprecedented scale.

‘Even the recent COP26 gathering in Glasgow cannot match the amount of preparation and planning that has gone into this operation.

‘In order for the next few days to be successful we need the public to play their part by planning ahead, checking before they travel, and allowing extra time for journeys.

‘The northbound carriageway of the Kingsway and A90 will be open throughout.

‘Other roads may be closed at short notice, at the discretion of senior officers within Police Scotland.

‘Every effort will be made to minimise disruption to the travelling public, but significant delays are expected.

‘Please plan ahead and use public transport where possible. If you

absolutely have to travel by car, allow extra time and only park within designated areas.

‘For up to date travel information and other updates, visit the Traffic Scotland website and twitter feeds, and check local authority websites for more localised information.’     

 

Police officers patrol in the streets of Edinburgh, which will become a focus of national mourning today and tomorrow

Police officers patrol in the streets of Edinburgh, which will become a focus of national mourning today and tomorrow 

 

Members of the public wait on the Royal Mile in the historic centre of Edinburgh to view the cortege this afternoon

Members of the public wait on the Royal Mile in the historic centre of Edinburgh to view the cortege this afternoon 

A major policing operation will be underway on the Royal Mile and across the rest of Edinburgh to allow mourning to go ahead

A major policing operation will be underway on the Royal Mile and across the rest of Edinburgh to allow mourning to go ahead

A major policing operation will be underway on the Royal Mile and across the rest of Edinburgh to allow mourning to go ahead 

 

 

Related Articles

Back to top button