Female

Outraged women criticise LTN in Fulham as they’re forced to walk home alone at night because Uber drivers will not enter controversial zone

Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTN) have stirred up more controversy after female Uber passengers branded them an attack on personal safety.

Women are being forced to walk the streets alone late at night in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham following the council’s decision to introduce an LTN zone that prevents out of borough Uber drivers from entering the area due to the risk of fines.

While Black cabs are exempt from the fines, Uber is yet to find a solution with the council. As a result, passengers are dropped off at boundary roads and must walk home alone, which can often take upwards of 20 minutes.

Made in Chelsea star Tabitha Willett, 32, who visits a South Fulham private members club, is one of the many women forced to walk home late at night. 

‘My club is inside the South Fulham LTN,’ she said. ‘But, many Uber drivers refuse to drive in which means we have to walk in the dark and the rain. It’s a huge inconvenience. I blame the council for introducing the LTN,’ she told The Telegraph

Made in Chelsea star Tabitha Willet (pictured) has called the LTN a major ‘inconvenience’ after she was forced to walk home in the dark 

Elsewhere, Hillary Cannon, the owner of Barrefly, a fitness business on New Kings Road, has spoken out about the LTN and taken action into her own hands.

Taking to Instagram, Hillary said: ‘Please stop scrolling if you are a woman who lives in Fulham.’

She continued: ‘There is currently a camera scheme going on in Fulham neighbourhoods, several of them, but today I wanted to talk about the neighbourhood specifically around the one near Wandsworth Bridge Road.’

‘This camera scheme fines cars for driving through the streets if they’re not registered to do so,’ she continued.

‘And as a result of this scheme, Uber is now refusing to drop women at their front doors and is instead dropping them at the top of Parson’s Green and other points far from their homes, forcing them to walk home alone in the middle of the night.

She added: ‘So, I’ve written to the council to complain about this. Other women have written to the council to complain about it. We’re getting nowhere, so I guess, as per usual, it’s on us.

Hillary explained her planned response: ‘Here’s what I’m doing. I’m starting a WhatsApp group specifically for young women who live in the neighbourhood. 

‘So, if you are one, if you know one, please circulate this video and join us.’

‘My hope is that if you’re coming home late at night and you’re afraid you’re going to get dropped off at the top of the high street and forced to walk home. 

Hillary Cannon, the owner of Barrefly, a fitness business on New Kings Road, has taken action into her own hands to prevent women from feeling unsafe in the area

Hillary Cannon, the owner of Barrefly, a fitness business on New Kings Road, has taken action into her own hands to prevent women from feeling unsafe in the area 

‘Maybe you can ping this group and see if anybody else is in the same position. Maybe we can get some strength in numbers to prevent another assault.’

Hillary concluded: ‘I guess it’s on us ladies. I’m furious that I have to make this video, but here we are.’

The post amassed over 2,000 likes. She captioned the video: ‘Please watch this video. Then please share this video, and tag anyone you know who might be affected by this scheme, and if that someone is you, then please join us.

‘This is about women’s safety in our neighbourhood – a subject about which we care very very much.’

A wooden bollard in Oxford was sawn off in April in the row over Low Traffic Neighbourhoods

A wooden bollard in Oxford was sawn off in April in the row over Low Traffic Neighbourhoods 

Bollards have been placed in a street in Cowley near Oxford, to create a Low Traffic Neighbourhood

Bollards have been placed in a street in Cowley near Oxford, to create a Low Traffic Neighbourhood 

A motorcyclist is pictured next to planters at the LTN on Evering Road in Hackney, East London

A motorcyclist is pictured next to planters at the LTN on Evering Road in Hackney, East London

A council spokesman told The Telegraph that it has been over three years since they first offered Uber free access through the streets of Fulham without the threat of fines to allow residents to be dropped off at their homes.

However, they stated that Uber’s data protection laws have stopped them from sharing the number plates of their drivers.

While they believe a resolution is achievable, they urged Uber to reconsider its technicalities.

A Hammersmith and Fulham’s council spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘It is over three years now since we first offered Uber free access through the cameras to allow residents to be picked up and dropped off at their homes. We told Uber this simply requires a technical solution at their end.

‘Uber has said there are data protection issues which prevent them sharing the number plates of their drivers. We are confident these can be resolved but we need Uber to agree to meet us at a technical level, which they have so far not done. We are still pressing for this to happen.’

An Uber spokesperson said: ‘At Uber we know we have a responsibility to help ensure that everyone gets home safely. 

‘We are aware of these concerns and continue to be in conversation with Hammersmith and Fulham Council to try and find a workable solution for both drivers and local residents.’

How LTNs have caused drivers misery despite trying to get people walking or cycling

Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTNs) began appearing in towns and cities across Britain during the pandemic, when they were sometimes installed with little or no consultation.

The schemes operated by local councils attempt to limit traffic with drivers often prevented from using quiet residential roads as through routes.

They are also designed to encourage uptake of other modes of transport, but have attracted much criticism over claims they are an attack on drivers.

LTNs – intended to get more people cycling and walking – are unpopular with many motorists who have found themselves barred from driving on familiar local routes and forced onto traffic-clogged main roads.

Others say LTNs make it impossible for residents or businesses to go about their daily lives and have turned some areas into rat-runs in favour of more affluent streets.

Hackney in East London is the borough with the highest proportion of LTNs on street, having introduced 19 since 2020. 

The council says more than 70 per cent of ‘eligible roads’ in the borough are covered by a low traffic zone, which is 50 per cent of the total area of Hackney.

In November 2022, the TaxPayers’ Alliance estimated that ‘cash cow’ LTNs have generated up to £100 million of income for local councils since their inception.

  • For more: Elrisala website and for social networking, you can follow us on Facebook
  • Source of information and images “dailymail

Related Articles

Back to top button
Open chat
Hello
Can we help you?